Q&A: Students talk strategies to cope with mental health

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The Catalyst / Jessica Ai

NDB freshman Jessica Ai.

NDB students discussed the impact the pandemic has had on their mental health thus far.

The Catalyst talked to freshman Jessica Ai, sophomore Desea Bond, junior Emma Treanor, and senior Lauren Massey.

 

TC: So, with quarantine, how has it shaped your mental health?
JA: “It’s worse [than before] since I couldn’t get any physical education…my volleyball program got canceled and I couldn’t get any activities done.”

TC: What have you been doing to better your mental health?

JA: “This summer my volleyball program got started, so I tried to sign up for those programs, and my brother is doing some workout things at home. And so I just go and workout with him.”

TC: What is your advice to other students?

JA: “Don’t watch your phone too much, like get your homework and things you have to do first [done]. If you’re doing a project…last minute it’ll impact your grade a lot and stress you out a lot.”

 

TC: So, with quarantine, how has it shaped your mental health?

DB: “My mental health has gotten a little bit better just because I have more time for myself, just being at home. But it has just kind of sucked not being able to see my friends as much as I used to.”

TC: What have you been doing to better your mental health?

DB: “I’ve been trying to talk to my friends more, like, about what I’m feeling. You know, I’m trying to open up to them more, just because I would want them to open up to me more…I want them to feel comfortable reaching out to me and talking to me. So I like talking to them.”

TC: What is your advice to other students?

DB: “Have people that you can reach out to, like, whether it’s a teacher or like a family member or friend. I think just having someone to talk to and to help you [with] what you’re going through is good.”

 

TC: So, with quarantine, how has it shaped your mental health?

ET: “It’s not necessarily better or worse, it’s just harder to deal with…it’s a little more precarious than it was before because I’m not seeing my friends. It’s just, it’s a little more difficult.”

TC: What have you been doing to better your mental health?

ET: “For me, I like to hang out with my dogs, and I like to play music, and I also like to read, or take walks down to Laurel Street and get a boba tea. It’s even through its small, [those] things can make a big difference.”

TC: What is your advice to other students?

ET: “I think when you’re struggling with mental health, it’s really easy to feel alone. So I think one of the main things that can help is sort of reaching out to people… And just accepting that mental health can’t be solved or fixed in a day, but you can definitely take baby steps that can help you get where you want to be.”

 

TC: So, with quarantine, how has it shaped your mental health?

LM: “I struggled with mental illness a lot before [quarantine]. It wasn’t awesome, but I [was] definitely doing better and then quarantine happened, and things got bad again. But i’ve been working a lot with my family on coming up with a routine and ways to improve my lifestyle.”

TC: What have you been doing to better your mental health?

LM: “My therapist and I have this thing, it’s the 5 ways of living. It’s: eating healthy, drinking water, calling a friend, sleeping, and exercising. And so I try really hard to implement those into my life.”

TC: What is your advice to other students?

LM: “Reach out and make friends, that’s something I didn’t do, or haven’t done recently, or even [done] in the past. I’ve gotten really shy, so I don’t really reach out and make friends, but I’ve come to realize that socializing is really important and it’s always nice to have someone there.”

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