Bundle up, it’s cold inside

Victoria Giomi, News Editor

NDB is known for its history, for its traditions, and for especially preparing its young women for life. But, as each generation comes and goes, the building still has the same poor heating system that it has had for nearly one hundred years.

The classroom heaters are notorious for their random temperature rises and drops throughout the day. One second, they are off. The next second, they are on.  On all the way. One second, it’s really cold. One second, it’s really hot.

Sometimes, the heat takes a long time to travel and warm an entire classroom.  Students stand near the heaters like it’s their living room fireplace.

Given the heaters themselves are bare metal in our small classrooms, it is not unusual for students to accidentally bump into or touch them and get just a little burned by them.

The classrooms windows are also notorious because they let a lot of the hot air escape and allow cold air into the building. There is always a little gap around the edges, letting air in and out of the building. It is a waste of energy.

Some teachers try to help their classes out with a portable heater, blowing hot air around their classrooms. But, it only goes so far.

As winter hit the Bay Area, many students tried to cope with the cold weather by wearing sweats under their skirts and bringing blankets to cover their legs at school.  But, they were eventually not allowed to do so because of how “unprofessional” it looked. The school allowed students to wear leggings under their skirts, but they’re not enough to keep students warm. Some students even started to wear beanies, but were not allowed to do that either.

It really seems like students are helpless when it comes to staying warm. Yes, our school building is old.  Yes, we have limited resources. 

But, without a more modern heating system and with seemingly every article of clothing being banned, except their uniforms, students are just left out in the cold. At least until the summer months when it’s really hot and there’s no air conditioning to stay cool.

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